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According to science, swearing would be good for health

In case of stress, nervousness or frustration, let go! Science gives you the green light: swearing would be good for your health. Here’s why.

Who would’ve believed that? The bad words that most people try to avoid are actually good for health. This is the conclusion of several scientific studies, beginning with that conducted by researchers at the University of Keele, UK.

“The curses are such a common response to the pain there must be a reason behind them,” suggests Richard Stephens, a psychologist and lead author of the study. As part of his research, he has found that swearing during a painful experience seems to increase the threshold of tolerance to pain, and even reduce the amount of pain perceived.

Use with moderation

Nuance, however: according to scientists, this amazing correlation has been found only in people swearing little overall. Like all the good things in this world, it must be used with moderation.

Among other positive health effects, scientists have found the cathartic power of the big word. “They communicate very effectively, almost immediately, our feelings,” said psychologist Timothy Jay. According to him, obscenities and other profanities can also be a sign of intelligence: “the use of loose words in a fluid manner is associated in a general way with the verbal fluidity,” he says.

Brady Roberts

I am a full-time med student and part-time contributor for News Today World, helping to conduct research and write stories covering what's happening in the industry.

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Email contact: brady@newstodayworld.org
Brady Roberts